New answers tagged

6

It's "Standortvermittlung", meaning a Telephone exchange serving a certain garrison. The term can be found in older telephone books as well as in the "Zentrale Dienstvorschrift für die Bundeswehr" ZVD 64-10 dating from 1979 (the abbreviation is "StOvr:ni" - please don't ask what the "ni" means...). There's even one ...


1

These are, as has been suspected, really two words: It's the garrison (Standort) Minsk MAZ., and I suggest "Operator" for Vermittlung. Someone with more historical or military knowledge may have a better interpretation of "Vermittlung". The concatenated term "Standortvermittlung" in modern day German would suggest a brokerage (&...


1

There are two indications that STANDORT (der Standort) and VERMITTLUNG (die Vermittlung) are two separate words: There is no hyphen that would combine them. The different letter sizes keep them separate. Based on the context you gave, we can assume that Vermittlung is most likely a (telephone) operator station and that MINSK MAZ. refers to the Polish city ...


2

Prepositions are the bane of anyone trying to learn a second language. Trying to translate them directly can only lead to confusion. The best approach seems to be to discover each of the possible uses and meanings of each preposition, and figure what is the best match in the other language for that use and meaning. That should, in fact, be the approach you ...


1

Accepted wisdom is that in train timetables the abbreviations had to be distinct, so shortening Sonnabend to Son is not helping anyone, since Sonntag is shortened to Son too. Samstag shortens to Sam, so the railways used it in timetables and it caught on.


3

»... what looks like an inherent plural ending ...« You think -en is a plural ending? No, it's not: Leben, Norden, Osten, Süden, Westen, Rahmen, Wagen, Zeichen, Morgen, Schaden, Garten, ... Nor is -sen an indicator for plural Wissen, Essen, Wesen, Rasen, Eisen, Felsen, Kissen, Besen, Tresen, Spesen, Fressen, Grinsen, ... Some of these words even are ...


-1

I am not a linguist, but the word Busen seems closely connected to an old word for lips (see https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bosom). This word is still around in colloquial German with the word Bussi, meaning kiss. That could mean that Busen orginally connoted as something like "for the lips" or "to the lips" reflecting the act of feeding ...


5

Saying that either version prevailed in German is a broad claim, as the different usage splits German landscape for more than a millennium in a south-westen region using Samstag and a more north-eastern with Sonnabend. Not to mention that it as well goes along the split between Catholic and Protestant regions. Confession has done a lot to solidify the split ...


-3

"Nix" and "nics" are not words from any German dialect, but simply words from another language. "Niks" is a very common and ordinary Dutch word meaning "nichts". However: Don't tell Germans that. They don't like to hear that. They generally tend to think of the Dutch language as a dialect of German, rather than a true ...


0

The title is paradox, "Pfadarbeit" being something that inherently comes with its own guidance. You can't guide someone through the process of finding his or her own way. That makes it ever so much harder to translate the meaning. Any translation that fails to incorporate the irony as well as the essence will miss the point. I would translate "...


1

This is not that different from English, the problem is hard to solve. A complication, for which I could not give you a rule, is that lösende is actually an infinitive in disguise: Das Problem ist schwer zu lösen. Es ist ein schwer zu lösendes Problem. Omitting the zu would, by accident, lead a grammatical sentence, but it would be non-sensical. Es ist ...


0

Laut Duden sind diese Begriffe Synonyme. Ich habe auch in philosophischen Wörterbüchern gesucht und habe nur "Wesen" gefunden und nicht "Wesenheit". Ein bisschen Kontext wäre vielleicht hilfreich :D In der Alltagssprache habe ich nur "das Wesen" gehört, kommt allerdings auch nicht häufig vor.


3

"Pfadarbeit" isn't a word that can be found in German dictionaries. It's a neologism used in esoteric circles for various different concepts, often referring to forms of meditation or spritual journeys. You will probably have to find out what the specific author you're translating means by it. If you're specifically talking about the "Pathwork ...


0

Pathwork (Pfadarbeit) is a lifelong spiritual path of self-discovery that helps us understand how life works, heal our emotional wounds, and promote harmony and balance in our own being as well as with others and God. /** https://de.theguidespeaks.com/mehr/Was-ist-Pfadarbeit%3F/#About-Doing-the-Work **/


1

Versteckt sich da also irgendwo ein Sinn drin? Die Antwort liegt beim Leser bzw. Hörer. Die einzelnen Worte des Gedichts sind durchaus wohlklingend, obschon nicht im Duden zu finden und weitgehend sinnfrei. Allerdings animieren sie dazu, über mögliche Bedeutungen nachzudenken, und das führt immerhin zu einer Runde "Gehirnjogging". Der Mensch neigt ...


1

Mit Kraweel dürfte weder die Karavelle noch eine Person gemeint sein, eher der Lautklang eines Raben, der die Einleitung zum Drama bildet, daher am Ende noch einmal wiederholt. Der Rabe würde im weiteren Verlauf wohl als "Erzähler", der von außen auf die vorgetragene Geschichte blickt, weiter eine Rolle haben. Dies ist eine oft benutzte Form. Dazu ...


4

There is an aspect to this that has not been mentioned. "Hopfenkaltschale" or "Bierkaltschale" was a real dish. When you look at cooking books from the 19th century it is a common recipe. From Dieter Gallun's. Aus Omas alten Kochbuch. BIERKALTSCHALE. 75 g geriebenes Brot 1 Stück Zitronen oder Apfelsinenschale 1 Prise gestoß. Zimt 65 g ...


2

Beide Formen sind gültig, DWDS nennt Rechtssprechung als Nebenform; ich vermute, dass das Fugen-s sich wegen aufwändiger separater Aussprache nicht so aufdrängt. Wikipedia gibt bei zusammengesetzten Substantiven eine Quote von 72,8% für keinen Fugenlaut an.


0

"Ausgetreten" umschreibt Beschädiung normaler Benutzung zufolge, wogegen "abgetreten" eher bezogen ist auf Folgen von Misbrauch oder besonders rücksichtsloser Nutzung. Auf Schuhe bezogen könnte man sogar von "ausgewohnt" reden, was noch ein Schritt weiter geht. Beispiele (gemackshalber für Schuhe): "Ausgetreten" sind ...


19

According to Duden, Kaltschale is a kind of soup that is served cold. "Hopfenkaltschale" could therefore be translated as "cold hops soup". It is a name occasionally used to jokingly refer to beer. There is even a Duden entry for Hopfenkaltschale, confirming this usage ("umgangssprachlich scherzhaft" - colloquial and jokingly) ...


6

"Hopfenkaltschale" is a used word for beer, as you have correctly recognized. And "vegane Hopfenkaltschale" is then just a vegan beer, although beer is already vegan anyway. Und es ist leider nicht das Bier, das die vielen Inder jetzt lieber im Rachen hätten


4

The word Geschichtenscheissenschlopff was certainly created by Thompson and it is definitely not a correct German word formation. If one reads the word, one finds the three components Geschichten scheissen Schlopff Taking it literally without any context, Geschichten means stories and scheissen means to shit. The third component is not a German word, it ...


6

Die sinnvollste grammatikalische Form ist für diese Bedeutungen das Partizip Perfekt, weil es sich um Prozesse handelt, die ziemlich lange dauern. ausgetreten können neben Schuhen auch Treppenstufen sein, deren Kante im Lauf der Jahrzehnte eine Rundung nach unten erfährt. abgetreten habe ich auch schon von Fußabstreifern, Teppichen (oder allgemeiner: ...


5

Wenn es um die Bedeutung "abnutzen" geht, werden sowohl "austreten" als auch "abtreten" in aller Regel bei Schuhen verwendet, und das meistens im Passiv der Vergangenheit. Wenn Schuhe "ausgetreten sind", dann haben sie sich durch die Benutzung geweitet oder sonstwie die Form verändert. Die Schuhe sitzen dann nicht mehr ...


6

Short answer: No long answer: »Geschichtenscheissenschlopff« is a compound word, built from 3 parts: Geschichte tale, story or history Scheiße or scheißen shit (noun) or to shit (verb) Schlopff ??? The first two parts are existing German words, but the third is not. There can't be any German word ending in »-pff« because this sequence of consonants doesnt ...


0

No, Geschichtenscheissenschlopff is not a German word. At first sight, it seems to be a composition of Geschichten (stories), scheißen (to shit, to excrete), and Schlopff. The composition of the first two, Geschichtenscheißen, would be understood in a vulgar manner as something like story excretion, but it is absolutely unidiomatic and certainly not used by ...


8

Going through the parts of the compound word: Schlopff is not a word at all. "-pff" as a word ending doesn't exist any more in modern German. I can't think of any similar German word either that he could have meant, but see RDBury's comment: it could be an attempt at "germanizing" slop. Geschichte and Scheisse are actual words (meaning ...


2

The German word »einmal« does not always mean »once« in the sense of »one times« (i.e. not twice). It sometimes has other meanings too: There is the typical beginning of many fairy tales: Es war einmal ein König, der hatte drei Töchter. Once upon a time there was a king who had three daughters. The meaning of the phrase »es war einmal« (»once upon a time«) ...


3

'Einmal' is not just an adverb but also a particle that is used to emphasize or modify a statement. To use the expression in a context: Zuerst einmal ist 'einmal' nicht nur ein Adverb mit der Bedeutung 'ein [eventuell einziges] Mal' sondern auch ein Partikel das verstärkend, einschränkend oder schlicht satzbelebend eingesetzt werden kann. The adverbial use ...


2

Hier muss man beachten, dass ein Wort ausgelassen ist. Vollständig (oder fast schon übervollständig) lautet der Satz: Ihre Tochter ist das größte Kind von allen Kindern in der Klasse. Da "Kind", beziehungsweise "Kinder", aber danach genannt wird, wird es oft beim ersten Mal weggelassen und heißt dann: Ihre Tochter ist das größte von ...


4

Je nachdem, ob das mit dem Superlativ Bezeichnete im Singular oder im Plural steht, wird derjenige Artikel verwendet, den das Substantiv im Singular oder im Plural hätte. Zum Beispiel: der größte aller Berge (der Berg) die größte aller Partys (die Party) das größte aller Kinder (das Kind) die größten aller Kinder (die Kinder)


Top 50 recent answers are included