New answers tagged

0 votes

Meaning of "von" in "Was bist du von Beruf"

Another short answer: According to DWDS especially section V.3, von serves to indicate a general relation (as opposed to locational, time-related, causal, ...), here especially restricting the query ...
  • 25.9k
0 votes

Meaning of "von" in "Was bist du von Beruf"

The grammatical structure has already been explained in other answers. As far as the meaning is concerned, it may be helpful to think of "von" in this case as kind of denoting the source of ...
0 votes

Meaning of "von" in "Was bist du von Beruf"

Here are some similar sentences: Ludwig ist Maler trotz Farbenblindheit. Irene ist Tänzerin aus Leidenschaft. Franz Joseph ist Kaiser von Gottes Gnaden. Heinrich ist Priester durch Berufung. Barbara ...
-2 votes

Meaning of "von" in "Was bist du von Beruf"

The implied comparison to English by trade, is meaningful. Some users are teachers by trade and may be able to explain this better, but as a matter of etymology I'm afraid this is obscure. Von can be ...
  • 2,059
0 votes

Meaning of "von" in "Was bist du von Beruf"

In this context 'von' means 'of' as in 'of which profession are you'.
0 votes

Can I title something without an article?

You don't need the article in a title. If you do use the definite article "die" here, you get a different meaning. Much like in English, it would mean that you refer to special, known, ...
  • 20.7k
-1 votes

Accurate translation of 'bruised'? 'Verletzt' does not seem correct

A single adjective that would get the meaning across quite precisely, albeit by metaphor, is verdellt. A Delle is specifically a kind of damage inflicted by blunt impact. The actual meaning is dent, ...
9 votes

Accurate translation of 'bruised'? 'Verletzt' does not seem correct

Falls es ein Adjektiv (in dem Fall: eine adjektivische Phrase) als Übersetzung für bruised sein soll, so schlage ich grün und blau vor. Das wird - wenigstens dort, wo ich herkomme - als Ausdruck für ...
  • 3,901
12 votes

Accurate translation of 'bruised'? 'Verletzt' does not seem correct

Another proposal: lädiert It is not specific concerning the kind of damage and may also be used for things. A nice aspect is, that the corresponding substantive Läsion is a medical term.
  • 25.9k
6 votes

Accurate translation of 'bruised'? 'Verletzt' does not seem correct

The layman's terms are der Bluterguss/Blutergüsse and der blaue Fleck/blaue Flecke(n). A black eye is called "blaues Auge" or "Veilchen". There is no adjective directly ...
  • 20.7k
6 votes

Accurate translation of 'bruised'? 'Verletzt' does not seem correct

There is not a single word to translate "bruised" - but German has the wonderful expression "Blaue Flecken". So a sentence like "his body was a mass of bruises afther he had ...
  • 7,592
15 votes

Accurate translation of 'bruised'? 'Verletzt' does not seem correct

Bruises are called blaue Flecken in German, and there's no adjective for that. You have to rephrase. Du hast da einen blauen Fleck. You have a bruise there. Dein Arm ist voller blauer Flecken. ...
  • 49.1k
1 vote

Why do we remove "es" in "mir ist kalt" but don't do that in "Mir geht es gut"

This is one of the cases when a German sentence does not require a subject. Generally, in a German sentence, a subject (or at least an es as a formal subject) is required. But there are exceptions. ...
  • 14k
1 vote

Why do we remove "es" in "mir ist kalt" but don't do that in "Mir geht es gut"

To me, the es is implied in the first example, but unspoken. The grammatical jargon here is "ellipsis", meaning that one or more sentence elements are left out even though they are ...
  • 9,113
-3 votes

Why do we remove "es" in "mir ist kalt" but don't do that in "Mir geht es gut"

The es is enclitic reduced to 's and assimilated in complex consonant clusters: is[t['s]] Mir is' kalt. And as if to add emphasis, the proper exclamation follows a differe t word order Wa, is mir ...
  • 2,059
6 votes

Why do we remove "es" in "mir ist kalt" but don't do that in "Mir geht es gut"

"Es" is a tricky word, because it is actually used in (at least) two cases (and if you're really new to German, you might simply want to ignore these very special cases for the time being): ...
  • 59.9k
2 votes

Ich will wissen was genau mit dem Satz gemeint ist. "Wir erwarten Sie schon"

Das Wort »erwarten« ist ein Verb, und es bedeutet, dass deine zukünftigen Arbeitgeber hoffen, dass du zu Ihnen kommst. Das Wort stammt zwar sprachgeschichtlich von »warten« ab, aber die ursprüngliche ...
1 vote

Ich will wissen was genau mit dem Satz gemeint ist. "Wir erwarten Sie schon"

In this case "schon" means "already". They are waiting for you already. It is just a friendly phrase meaning they are looking forward to your coming.
  • 3,901
2 votes

Ich will wissen was genau mit dem Satz gemeint ist. "Wir erwarten Sie schon"

Das ist eine feststehende Formel. Wir erwarten Sie schon. — Wir freuen uns schon auf den Tag, an dem Sie endlich kommen.
  • 49.1k
4 votes
Accepted

What does "vor" mean?

The English translation of "viertel vor eins" is "a quarter to one". But of course the word to in this phrase has the meaning of before. See here: #2. When to Use ‘a Quarter’ and ‘...
  • 9,528
3 votes

What does "vor" mean?

What you heard is written as Viertel vor eins So 12:45.
  • 17.7k
1 vote

German word that means ‘one who thinks with their hands’. It was a single word, I can not recall it. Any ideas?

The term »mit den Händen denken« ("thinking with hands") is not very common. The most websites that deal with it are from Switzerland. Sources: Title of a creative workshop This seems to be ...
7 votes
Accepted

Bedeutung des Wortes die Wohlstandsverwahrlosung?

Der Begriff wurde in den 1990er Jahren von der Psychologin Ulrike Zöllner in ihrem Buch "Die armen Kinder der Reichen" geprägt. Ein ähnlicher englischer Begriff ist "affluenza". Er ...
  • 20.7k
3 votes

Bedeutung des Wortes die Wohlstandsverwahrlosung?

Dieser Begriff wird als Synonym für Verwöhn-Verwahrlosung eingesetzt. Er setzt sich zusammen aus "Wohlstand" (wealth) und "Verwahrlosung" (neglegation). Eine umfänglich passende ...
  • 1,767
0 votes

Gehirn vs. Hirn

Also ich kenne Hirn auch nur in der Verwendung als Bezeichnung für den Verstand, etwa in: Schalt dein Hirn ein Was auch nicht zwangsläufig abwertend gemeint sein muss! Ich verwende es schließlich ...
0 votes

What is the meaning of "mehr" in this context?

Mehr in this context means "longer" (or "more") So: She cannot get down on her own any longer. (or anymore) Better English: She can no longer get down on her own.
7 votes

Kann man "halten" anstatt des "abhalten" in diesem Kontext benutzen?

Abhalten wird hier in der Bedeutung 4, "eine Zusammenkunft veranstalten, stattfinden lassen" vgl. DWDS verwendet. Interessant ist, dass Manöver sogar im Abschnitt Typische Verbindungen mit ...
  • 25.9k
10 votes

What is the meaning of "mehr" in this context?

In this context, "nicht mehr" is a compound that translates to "no more" / "not anymore". So, it signifies that something was true before, but isn't any longer true. The ...
  • 449
22 votes
Accepted

What is the meaning of "mehr" in this context?

I think the provided translation is leaving it untranslated for no or little good reason. In this context it translates as 'anymore', which changes the meaning slightly: She cannot get down on her ...
  • 7,592
0 votes

Wie kam »etwas ist alle« zur Bedeutung »etwas ist aufgebraucht«?

There is a nice background on: Das ist schon alle alle. Diese Redensart kommt aus Berlin, das heute noch die meisten Worte aus dem Französischen hat. Die meisten Hugenotten kamen nach Berlin und ...
1 vote

Hidden meaning in this Heine-Schumann poem from "Dichterliebe"

To me, there is no irony, or feigned stoicism at all. The selected answer covers that aspect. Other comments added ideas like the protagonist presumably wanting to be not emotional. That seems to be ...
4 votes
Accepted

Why "Führerschein" instead of "Fahrerschein"?

That's because German traffic legislation doesn't traditionally know anything about a "Fahrer". He's called a Kraftfahrzeugführer. (Probably because "fahren" doesn't necessarily ...
  • 59.9k
1 vote

How do you call "hiring manager" in German?

"Hiring manager", refers to the manager, which is currently "hiring" for their department. Thus, we must assume that "hiring" is the present participle of hire. Then, the ...
8 votes

Meaning of "Autoritätsdusel" in context (Einstein quote from 1901)

The question is kind of opinion-based ("Which translation is the best?") and requires expertise in English, I'm not sure if it's a good fit for this site. What I can do though is try to ...
  • 20.7k

Top 50 recent answers are included