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I would translate it as He had a waiter assign him a table. So imho your translation (2) fits the meaning of "anweisen" best. "Anweisen" does also include the "show" part though. The waiter allocates a table and tells (or shows) the customer where to take place, and all of that is elegantly included in "einen Tisch ...


2

The first translation is accurate. The second translation doesn't appear to be good English. The third translation has a subtly different meaning. The proposed alternative sentence translates to "The waiter showed him his table." That's not the same as the original and fits better with translation #3. Although the word order of the German sentence ...


4

Es gibt im Deutschen keine Regel, die direkt aufeinanderfolgende Nomen verbietet. Es gibt allerding auch keine Regel, die das erlaubt. Ob Nomen direkt aufeinanderfolgen können oder nicht, hängt in deinen Beispielen von zwei grammatischen Regeln ab: Die Ordnung der Satzglieder. Die ist im Deutschen nicht vorgeschrieben, und Subjekt und Objekt können an fast ...


2

German word order is indeed very flexible. Actually, there are no rules for the positioning of subjects and objects in German - There only is a rule for the positioning of the verb, which must occupy position 2 in main clauses (not in imperative statements as in your examples, there the verb in imperative is at position 1), and end position in subclauses. ...


4

As a native German speaker, I do not recall having ever been taught rules for the order of this stuff. Different choices correspond to emphasizing particular words. Some orders feel to me as better respecting the logical relationship between the choices. Concretely, for your Sentence 1 both choices feel valid to me, but the second one has the more natural ...


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