New answers tagged

1

As you said, the standard word order order is Obwohl sich das nicht besonders anhört, ... If you have a reason, I see no problem in changing it to Obwohl das sich nicht besonders anhört, ... I would normally stick to the standard order wth this sentence. While it can generally make sense to change standard word order to emphasize certain parts of the ...


2

In general, the position of nicht depends on what you're trying to negate. The logical meaning is often the same so it can also depend on context and emphasis. If nicht is playing the role of an adverb, in other words it's telling you the action described is not happening, then it come near the end of the sentence. For example Ich schlafe nicht. -- "I'm ...


0

Beide Sätze sind richtig. Die Bedeutung ist nur ganz leicht unterschiedlich. Das liegt nämlich daran, was als erstes erwähnt wird. Das Wichtige wird meistens zuerst erwähnt. Das würde man beim Aussprechen erkennen, je nach Betonung. Im ersten Satz wird der Fokus eher auf "Ferien" gelegt. Die Ferien beginnen heute, wie schön, endlich kein ...


2

Es kommt ganz einfach darauf an, was verneint werden soll, und daraus ergibt sich die Position der Verneinung. Ich sehe nicht gerne fern - Hier wird der gesamte Satz verneint, das Prädikat und die Modalität. Der Sprecher meint, dass er es nicht mag, auf dem Sofa zu sitzen und fernzusehen. Ich sehe gerne nicht fern - ist durchaus möglich, die Modalität ist ...


0

The most important difference between main and subordinate clauses in German is the position of the verbs. In a main clause (an independent sentence that can stand on its own feet), the conjugated verb is second and the main verb, if there is one, is at the end. By contrast, in a subordinate clause (a dependent sentence that provides additional information), ...


3

This is mostly a phenomenon of spoken and colloquial language. The emphasis is somewhat different. Nein, sie gehen nicht is the unemphasized, outright negation of sie gehen. It could be used in a context like: A: Gehen sie heute Abend zum Konzert? B: Nein, sie gehen nicht. They don't go (at all), but nicht isn't emphasized by the word order. The answer ...


3

Ich möchte bitte ein Glas Wasser. This is the standard word order in German, and you sound most fluent when you put it this way. Ich möchte ein Glas Wasser[,] bitte. This is a perfectly valid variant. My suspicion is that in oral communication, the most widespread reason for this being used by native speakers is that they forgot to add "bitte" ...


1

The term "two-verb sentence" is somewhat unfortunate. What we have here is a finite auxiliary verb and an infinite full verb. Actually it should rather be regarded as a single verb consisting of two parts. The position of these cannot be changed freely, and in particular they cannot be exhanged. English has similar constructs. What you are trying ...


2

As already mentioned in the comments, leisten and lassen are two different words. leisten means to afford sth, lassen means to get sth done (in this case). Your first sentence "er baut sich ein Haus leisten" doesn't make sense. The only way I can think of that this sentence could make sense is to say "er kann es sich leisten, ein Haus zu bauen&...


1

This question generated much more of a response than I was expecting, so I thought it would be useful, for me if for no one else, to post what I thought were the most important takeaways. This is going to be too long for a comment so I'm putting it in an answer, though I think at this point the original question has already been answered sufficiently. We ...


2

i'm afraid it is not exactly an enumeration nor a paranthesis, although the analysis as enumeration should suffice for convenience sake. Namely, if it were an enumeration, then both adverbial phrases would modify jagen. That's arguably still the case if the second phrase modifies the first, which modifies the main verb. In chronological and logical order, ...


2

There seem to be at least two ways to interpret immer den Hund zur Seite in a way not violating the V2-rule: A) Two co-ordinated adverbials As suggested by @HubertSchölnast and supported by @DavidVogt in the comments, mit tollen Sprüngen, immer den Hund zur Seite could be considered as one part of speech, consisting out of two co-ordinated adverbials. Then ...


6

The part mit tollen Sprüngen, immer den Hund zur Seite with great leaps, the dog always at their side is one part of speech. It is an enumeration that consists of two adverbial clauses. And this is true in German and in English. If you want you can insert a conjunction between the two parts: mit tollen Sprüngen und immer den Hund zur Seite with great ...


Top 50 recent answers are included