26

Since the link was broken, the new link to the results of the Atlas zur Deutschen Alltäglichen Sprache, respective 9th round is:


23

This is Sütterlin script (i.e., a later version of the Kurrent). Apart from that, I agree with @HalvarF that the text reads: Erinnerung an Neapel which translates to: Memory of Naples. Details It can't be Neagel (as @RookJameson suggested) because the rear stroke of the a would need to be the first stroke of the g at the same time, and even then the ...


21

Since the cases in German closely correspond to the cases in Latin, and since the Latin language is such a significant cultural possession of the Roman Catholic church, the name "Jesus Christus" is often declined in German according to the case endings in Latin. The Latin case endings are: Nominative: Jesus Christus Genitive: Jesu Christi Dative: Jesu ...


18

No, personal names are always spelled as they are officially registered on birth. They do not fall under the changes of rules of New German Orthography.(1) If an ß is not available (on your keyboard), you can use ss instead.(Regel 160)


18

In ancient times, a Meier was a land agent (the administrator of an estate). The estate that he administrated was called Meierei. Today many people have the name of this old profession as their family name. But there are dozens of different spellings with exactly the same pronunciation [ˈmaɪ̯ɐ]. Some of the most common spellings are: Meier (mit E, I) ...


17

Th as an abbreviation name can stand for many first names and is not explicitly intended for ONE first name. It can be for "Theodor", but it can also be "Thomas", "Thaddäus" or another first name that starts with "Th". But in your example, however, it is "Theodor": Dr. Theodor Gabler als ...


16

What you learnt is correct. You always write the umlaut unless you don’t have it on your keyboard. However especially in names the rules are somewhat flexible. So you might see people using the e behind the vowel instead of the umlaut and if that’s how the name is spelled then the official rule does not apply anymore. This is based on a case by case ...


16

Assuming that the spelling was unchanged upon immigration to the US, the pronunciation would be Fah-nel (IPA: [ˈfaːnəl]), with the ah pronounced like the sound your doctor asks you to make at a check up. That said, Fahnel isn’t an extremely common German name, and it’s very possible that your ancestors left Germany as Fähnels, and then had their name “...


14

Wenn die Queen im Nominativ steht: Königin Elisabeth die Zweite besuchte Berlin. Wenn sie selbst im Genitiv steht: Das ist der Hut der Königin Elisabeth der Zweiten. Dativ: Dieser Hut gehört Königin Elisabeth der Zweiten. Akkusativ: Heute sehen wir Königin Elisabeth die Zweite.


14

Für eine Königin ist es etwas schwerer zu erkennen als für einen König, da die Flexion von Feminina weniger eindeutig ist; deswegen möchte ich Huberts Antwort dahingehend ergänzen: Das ist Heinrich der Dreizehnte. (Nominativ) München ist eine Gründung Heinrichs des Dreizehnten. (Genitiv) Die Untertanen erwiesen Heinrich dem Dreizehnten die Ehre. (Dativ) Die ...


14

Proper nouns are not covered by orthographic rules, full stop. That is the essence when asking for why a given person or a given place is spelt the way they are. Excursion on the use of umlauts For normal words, the general rule is to have ü for most /y/* sounds, ö for most /ø/ sounds and ä for a certain portion of the /ɛ/ sound. Neither of these rules is ...


14

If the original form of the name was Ruhle without an umlaut, its German pronunciation would be very similar to the word ruler in non-rhotic accents of English (which include Australian English), i.e. with two syllables, unlike rule. In the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), the pronunciation would be represented as [ˈruːlə]. If, on the other hand, it ...


14

The article in the English Wikipedia gives two similar pronunciations /ˈɔɪlər/ (Swiss) and /ˈɔʏlɐ/ (German). I agree with them. The article even has a footnote that explains with references that English-style /ˈjuːlər/ is considered wrong, but it certainly isn’t uncommon. Unlike the variant Lennart or English Leonard, his given name Leonhard is pronounced ...


13

No, they cannot be used interchangeably nowadays. However, spelling used to be less strict, so in older documents you may find several spellings for the same person. Consequently, surnames today often exist in several spellings. There are people called Schulz and people called Schultz. There is Meier and Maier. There is Voss and Voß.


13

The h after the a is a length marker. The h itself is silent. It marks only, that the vowel before it is a long vowel. So, you pronounce "Pahl" exactly the same way as "Paal": [paːl] So, it's similar to "Mahl" [maːl], "Wahl" [vaːl], "fahl" [faːl], "kahl" [kaːl] and "Zahl" [t͡saːl], just ...


12

'ter' is a particle from the Netherlands, which means 'zur' in German. With that in mind, a quick search reveals that the dutch word 'Stegen' can be translated to 'Gasse' in German, which makes his name something like Marc-André zur Gasse. It seems that 'ter' would be used to say where someone is coming from, independent from social status. In our example,...


11

The appropriate thing to do would be to ask them. People with "foreign" names often want their name pronounced differently than German-speakers might otherwise pronounce them.


11

In your example it's indeed short for Theodor Gabler. Doctor theologiae is in short Dr. theol.. As @guidot pointed out in a comment: Any specification following Dr. is lower-case, as rer. nat. h.c. rer. pol. med. phil. ... etc.


10

Lange Antwort Ich bin erstaunt über die Behauptung "der Didi" klinge distanzierter als "Didi". Ich kenne zwei sprachliche Paradigmen, von denen keines diese Deutung nahelegt! Ich stamme aus dem Norden, lebe aber seit Jahren im Süden und in Österreich. Durch meine Erfahrungen im Süden, habe ich gelernt dem Artikel vor Namen in der ...


10

My first name is René. I call myself [ʁe:ˈne:] and most people default to this pronunciation even when they never spoke to me. Using the French pronunciation makes you sound smug. It's not commonly used in German. Don't use the French pronunciation unless the person is French / comes from a Francophone country. As always with such questions: In the end it ...


10

It's simply spelling out a and y for clarification. That's done often with last names like Mayer, because there are many other common spellings of that name like e.g. Meier or Maier.


10

In Germany, the degree Doctor theologiae is abbreviated as Dr. theol. Here, Th. abbreviates the given name of Dr. Gabler, which could be, for example Theodor Theodora Thomas Theolen Theobald Thaddeus / Thaddäus …


9

This is one of the instances where English and northern German languages show their relation: A fleet is a saline waterway, channel or inlet, literally meaning "something that flows" - the spelling varies a bit over time, but is recognizable. "Fleth" instead of "fleet" isn't far off. Especially 'h' often sort of a appears/disappears over time in many words. ...


9

English names are pronounced the English way, just as you described. (Another example is Justin) This is also true for most names from other languages. Just when such names contain consonants or vowels that are not used in German, they are replaced by sounds that are common in German. German has a long tradition of importing words from any other languages, ...


9

Namen verhalten sich grundsätzlich wie alle anderen Wörter, was die Etymologie betrifft. »Traditionell deutsche Vornamen« lassen sich einteilen in: von Germanischen Vorläufern abgeleitete Namen aus klassischen (altgriechisch, römisch/lateinisch) oder biblischen (hebräisch) Namen abgeleitete Namen Ich denke, die Frage möchte ersteres diskutieren. Zuerst ...


9

Ich habe nicht den Eindruck, dass es das Phänomen in Deutschland oder Europa in wirklich vergleichbarer Form gibt. Die typische "Karen" ist eine amerikanische weiße Generation-X- oder Boomer-Frau, die gewohnt ist, dass sie mehr erreicht, wenn sie mit genügend Energie auf jeder noch so unberechtigten Forderung beharrt. Das typische Beispiel ist ihr ...


8

A even more famous example is Goethe: The grandfather of the famous German poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe did not have the Name Goethe. His name was Friedrich Georg Göthe (with ö instead of oe). It would be wrong to write the poets name as Göthe, because this is not his name. Friedrich Georg Göthe decided to change the writing of his name, ...


8

Persönliche Einschätzung Ich persönlich würde den Sinn der Großschreibung sofort erfassen und mich über die Hilfe sehr freuen. Als unhöflich empfinde ich das nicht, denn es hilft, „peinliche“ Missverständnisse oder sogar Unhöflichkeiten zu verhindern. Es gibt für mich im Geschäftsverkehr nichts Schlimmeres, als wenn ich nicht weiß, welcher Teil des Namens ...


8

§49 der Rechtschreibregeln: Bei Ableitungen von mehreren Eigennamen, von Titeln und Eigennamen oder von einem mehrteiligen Eigennamen setzt man einen Bindestrich. dort werden die Beispiele die kant-laplacesche Theorie (Kant und Laplace), der de-costersche Roman (de Coster), die gräflich-rienecksche Güterverwaltung (Graf Rieneck) die Kant-...


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