57

"km" is usually pronounced as Kilometer, ka em [kaː ʔɛm] is at least where I am very unusual in everyday spoken German. ka em may be encountered more frequently in ka em ha [kaː ʔɛm haː] (km/h, the slash/division not being pronounced) as an alternative to saying "Stundenkilometer" colloquially, sometimes also Kilometer in der Stunde (sounds somewhat old-...


41

Das Wort Libyen entstammt – wie viele andere Bezeichnungen für Gebiete des östlichen Mittelmeerraums – dem Altgriechischen; dort wird die ensprechende Gegend Λιβύη (Libýe) geschrieben. Über das Lateinische ist diese Bezeichnung wie viele andere aus diese Gegend (Αἴγυπτος (Aígyptos), Ἀσσυρία (Assyría), Κύπρος (Kýpros)) ins Deutsche gekommen. Früher wurde ein ...


40

s and ch are spoken separately, if (and almost only if, see below) they are meeting due to some sort of word composition. The diminutive forms you give are examples for this: For instance, in Höschen is a composite of the “umlauted” stem of Hose, i.e., Hös-, and the diminutive suffix -chen. Something similar can happen with regular word composition, like in ...


24

In Standard German, a phenomenon called terminal devoicing (Auslautverhärtung in German) affects the pronunciation of word-final (or more generally: morpheme-final) consonants. It leads to the merging of the phoneme pairs b–p, d–t, w–f, g–k and /z/–/s/ (a phoneme pair not reflected in orthography). These are typically pronounced as if the unvoiced letter ...


23

It's from Latin, servus meaning slave, servant. So when someone greets you, Servus! it meant originally "[I am your] servant" but it is nowadays only a friendly greeting, like "Hi!" in English. Think of old-fashioned sign-offs in English letter-writing: Your obdt. & humble servant You will hear "Servus!" much more often in southern Germany ...


23

For those notes that are a letter of the alphabet, e.g. C, A, E, H, B (yes, that one, too) they are pronounced as the letter itself would be. Note, that English B is called H in German and English B flat is German B. A sharp is rendered as the syllable -is added to the letter name. So C♯, D♯, E♯ would be cis, dis, eis. Note that eis is pronounced e-is, not ...


21

Wiktionary is available in more than 150 different languages, and in each language it contains descriptions of the most frequent used words in this language. German Wiktionary has more than 750,000 entries, and there for each word you can find the correct pronunciation. The page about the word fünfundvierzig says, that there are two proper pronunciations ...


20

One possibility would be: Eins durch (die) fünfte Wurzel aus a plus c (zum) Quadrat. And Eins durch (die) dritte Wurzel aus p. So in general, you would use: Zähler durch Nenner for fractions and x-te Wurzel aus for the root part. So your second guess was quite right. -tel is normally just used for very simple fractions like ⅓ (ein Drittel)...


20

Jedenfalls ist in der kyrillischen Schrift der Konsonantencluster schtsch ein einzelner Buchstabe: Щ. Das spricht schon mal dafür, das Wort als einsilbig zu betrachten. Das hat aber für die Aussprache im Deutschen wenig Gewicht. Gewichtiger ist hingegen folgende Überlegung: Eine gesprochene Silbe hat einen Silbenkern (auch Silbengipfel genannt), der ...


19

Pommes Frites is of French/Belgian origin and therefore pronounced (almost) as in French, with the typical German errors in speaking French. Germans pronounce either /pɔm fʀɪts/ (this is more common) or /pɔm fʀɪt/ (which is the correct French pronunciation). Regional short forms are Pommes (pronounced /pɔməs/) and Fritten (/fʀɪtn/). In the short form ...


19

In standard pronunciation, short "ä" is [ɛ] and short "e" is [ə], [ɛ], or [e], where the last one occurs in foreign words ("Methode" [meˈtoːdə]) but rarely in native ones ("lebendig" [leˈbɛndɪç]). That means that most of the time, there is no audible difference between short "ä" and "e". For instance, the vowels in "nässer" and "besser" are the same, namely [...


18

Somewhere in the transition from Middle High German to New High German, the clusters [sk], [st] and [sp] became [ʃ], [ʃt] and [ʃp], respectively, when they were in the onset of a syllable. So, in German words "st" and "sp" are pronounced [ʃt] and [ʃp] only when they occur at the beginning of a syllable. In "Einstein", this is the case; in "Kunst" it is not. ...


17

It's actually nix It's slang for nichts, as you have guessed. I'd love to say something more but, first, I'd like to understand what is "good to use" (obviously, don't write nix it in a formal context!), and, secondly, I'm not an expert. Whence I'm pretty sure somebody will illuminate us with a better answer.


17

Im Deutschen ist formal [ɡluˈteːn] korrekt, da ist m.E. Deiner Recherche nichts hinzuzufügen, aber da die englische Aussprache eben [ˈɡluːtn̩] ist, scheint sich hier per verstecktem Anglizismus diese Aussprache einzuschleichen. Satire Zu unterscheiden ist vielleicht auch – mal ganz zynisch unterstellt – zwischen den Menschen, die an Zöliakie leiden und ...


16

Yes, there are: Weg [veːk], weg [vɛk]. It is, however, not the capitalization itself that affects pronunciation; it just so happens that one of the words is a noun and therefore capitalized.


15

In all languages including German spelling evolved over time with no fixed rules on orthography or spelling. Nevertheless people tried to find letters for phonetically similar sounds. In the family of phonetically related letters for the modern 'F' we can find the following, also relevant for "father", and "Vater" which have a common Indo-European root with ...


15

Both words are pronounced the same (in standard German): [ˈzaɪ̯tn̩], singular [ˈzaɪ̯tə]; source: Duden-Aussprachewörterbuch (3rd ed., 1990). German orthography has a tendency to separate homophones wherever possible; similar cases are Leib/Laib, Lärche/Lerche.


15

Assuming that the spelling was unchanged upon immigration to the US, the pronunciation would be Fah-nel (IPA: [ˈfaːnəl]), with the ah pronounced like the sound your doctor asks you to make at a check up. That said, Fahnel isn’t an extremely common German name, and it’s very possible that your ancestors left Germany as Fähnels, and then had their name “...


15

It depends on the region. There are two main variations. The "normal"* pronunciation would be like in 'gerne' (or like you would pronounce the 'ck' in the English word 'lick'). However, in some regions it's pronounced soft like the 'ch' in 'dich'. *normal, because it follows the default, distinct pronunciation for 'g', whereas (2) makes the 'g' sound ...


14

I never heard Germans (including myself) pronounce it other than eye-tee. I also think that this is the correct way to pronounce it since Information Technology is an English term and therefore should be pronounced English, not German. However if IT would refer to Informationstechnologie it is a German word and should be pronounced German. Though ...


14

Nix is, as was already pointed out, a colloquial, informal, shorter form of nichts. Nix does not derive from any specific dialect; rather it is present in one form or another in most dialects. There are rare exceptions like the Berlin dialect prefering nüscht It is okay to use in very informal writings, like text messages to friends or in a chat etc. Do ...


14

If the original form of the name was Ruhle without an umlaut, its German pronunciation would be very similar to the word ruler in non-rhotic accents of English (which include Australian English), i.e. with two syllables, unlike rule. In the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), the pronunciation would be represented as [ˈruːlə]. If, on the other hand, it ...


13

"Rules" for pronunciations are merely descriptive not prescriptive. The pronunciation depends on the whole word. The numbers up until 20 were more often used than numbers greater than 20 when the German language developed. That's why the pronunciation of "vierzehn" could develop more independently from "vier" than for example "vierhundert". So, the word "...


13

A lot of the German TV shows and movies (especially the ones produced by public TV channels) will actually have German subtitles produced for them to aid the deaf ("Unterstützung/Untertitel für Hörgeschädigte" or Keyword "barrierefrei"). All German DVDs (movies and shows) that I have bought so far have subtitles (in German). YouTube let's you enable ...


13

Zwar gibt es keine verbindliche einheitliche Ausspracheregelung für die deutsche Sprache, dennoch gab es und gibt es Versuche einer Normierungen: Bühnensprache nach Siebs Völlig auf die Bedürfnisse einer Theaterbühne ausgerichtet, wurde versucht, die Aussprache der Schauspieler auf den deutschen Theaterbühnen Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts zu normieren. Diese ...


13

The German sequence of the basic notes (white keys on piano) is: C, D, E, F, G, A, H. The system is simple. There is no »flat« or »sharp«, just the suffixes »-es« and »-is«. And you have to keep in mind, that the German name of the English B is H. There are five exceptions, they are written in boldface. I will not talk about enharmonic, I guess you know ...


13

Wir sind eine zutiefst literale Gesellschaft. Praktisch alles, was wir über Sprache zu wissen glauben, basiert auf ihrer Verschriftung. Darum ist der naive Ansatz, den die meisten Deutschsprechenden verfolgen werden, wenn man sie bittet, ein Wort rückwärts zu sprechen, der buchstabenzentrierte. Da die meisten in der 1. Klasse einige Buchstabenkombinationen ...


13

I have heard exactly one person systematically, non-ironically and non-mockingly pronounce dass as /da:s/, i.e. with a long /a:/. However, that person also systematically pronounced the /a/ sounds in ein nasses Glas identically: as /a:/. Thus, this person is not a good source aside from giving anecdotical evidence.[1] Every single other person I spoke to ...


13

[ç], see Duden as reference. The stage pronounciation rules also leave no other choice. In normal talk I decidedly assume regional variations. Especially for religious terms there seems to be an additional urge, to pronounce them unsloppy (similar to Tag) as incorrect as this may be.


13

Tz indicates that the preceding vowel is short; z doesn’t (though this may still be the case for other reasons). Most other consonants are doubled in such a situation; z is different for historical reasons, and instead of zz we write tz. The same thing happens to k and ß: We write ck instead of kk and ss instead of ßß. This is § 3 of the official spelling ...


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