57

"km" is usually pronounced as Kilometer, ka em [kaː ʔɛm] is at least where I am very unusual in everyday spoken German. ka em may be encountered more frequently in ka em ha [kaː ʔɛm haː] (km/h, the slash/division not being pronounced) as an alternative to saying "Stundenkilometer" colloquially, sometimes also Kilometer in der Stunde (sounds somewhat old-...


41

Das Wort Libyen entstammt – wie viele andere Bezeichnungen für Gebiete des östlichen Mittelmeerraums – dem Altgriechischen; dort wird die ensprechende Gegend Λιβύη (Libýe) geschrieben. Über das Lateinische ist diese Bezeichnung wie viele andere aus diese Gegend (Αἴγυπτος (Aígyptos), Ἀσσυρία (Assyría), Κύπρος (Kýpros)) ins Deutsche gekommen. Früher wurde ein ...


40

s and ch are spoken separately, if (and almost only if, see below) they are meeting due to some sort of word composition. The diminutive forms you give are examples for this: For instance, in Höschen is a composite of the “umlauted” stem of Hose, i.e., Hös-, and the diminutive suffix -chen. Something similar can happen with regular word composition, like in ...


26

For those notes that are a letter of the alphabet, e.g. C, A, E, H, B (yes, that one, too) they are pronounced as the letter itself would be. Note, that English B is called H in German and English B flat is German B. A sharp is rendered as the syllable -is added to the letter name. So C♯, D♯, E♯ would be cis, dis, eis. Note that eis is pronounced e-is, not ...


24

In Standard German, a phenomenon called terminal devoicing (Auslautverhärtung in German) affects the pronunciation of word-final (or more generally: morpheme-final) consonants. It leads to the merging of the phoneme pairs b–p, d–t, w–f, g–k and /z/–/s/ (a phoneme pair not reflected in orthography). These are typically pronounced as if the unvoiced letter ...


21

Wiktionary is available in more than 150 different languages, and in each language it contains descriptions of the most frequent used words in this language. German Wiktionary has more than 750,000 entries, and there for each word you can find the correct pronunciation. The page about the word fünfundvierzig says, that there are two proper pronunciations ...


20

It's actually nix It's slang for nichts, as you have guessed. I'd love to say something more but, first, I'd like to understand what is "good to use" (obviously, don't write nix it in a formal context!), and, secondly, I'm not an expert. Whence I'm pretty sure somebody will illuminate us with a better answer.


20

Jedenfalls ist in der kyrillischen Schrift der Konsonantencluster schtsch ein einzelner Buchstabe: Щ. Das spricht schon mal dafür, das Wort als einsilbig zu betrachten. Das hat aber für die Aussprache im Deutschen wenig Gewicht. Gewichtiger ist hingegen folgende Überlegung: Eine gesprochene Silbe hat einen Silbenkern (auch Silbengipfel genannt), der ...


18

Somewhere in the transition from Middle High German to New High German, the clusters [sk], [st] and [sp] became [ʃ], [ʃt] and [ʃp], respectively, when they were in the onset of a syllable. So, in German words "st" and "sp" are pronounced [ʃt] and [ʃp] only when they occur at the beginning of a syllable. In "Einstein", this is the case; in "Kunst" it is not. ...


17

Im Deutschen ist formal [ɡluˈteːn] korrekt, da ist m.E. Deiner Recherche nichts hinzuzufügen, aber da die englische Aussprache eben [ˈɡluːtn̩] ist, scheint sich hier per verstecktem Anglizismus diese Aussprache einzuschleichen. Satire Zu unterscheiden ist vielleicht auch – mal ganz zynisch unterstellt – zwischen den Menschen, die an Zöliakie leiden und ...


16

Assuming that the spelling was unchanged upon immigration to the US, the pronunciation would be Fah-nel (IPA: [ˈfaːnəl]), with the ah pronounced like the sound your doctor asks you to make at a check up. That said, Fahnel isn’t an extremely common German name, and it’s very possible that your ancestors left Germany as Fähnels, and then had their name “...


16

Yes, there are: Weg [veːk], weg [vɛk]. It is, however, not the capitalization itself that affects pronunciation; it just so happens that one of the words is a noun and therefore capitalized.


15

Both words are pronounced the same (in standard German): [ˈzaɪ̯tn̩], singular [ˈzaɪ̯tə]; source: Duden-Aussprachewörterbuch (3rd ed., 1990). German orthography has a tendency to separate homophones wherever possible; similar cases are Leib/Laib, Lärche/Lerche.


15

Nix is, as was already pointed out, a colloquial, informal, shorter form of nichts. Nix does not derive from any specific dialect; rather it is present in one form or another in most dialects. There are exceptions like the Berlin dialect prefering nüscht. User Mach suppied a map in the comments which is scrollable and zoomable at least on PC which shows the ...


15

It depends on the region. There are two main variations. The "normal"* pronunciation would be like in 'gerne' (or like you would pronounce the 'ck' in the English word 'lick'). However, in some regions it's pronounced soft like the 'ch' in 'dich'. *normal, because it follows the default, distinct pronunciation for 'g', whereas (2) makes the 'g' sound ...


14

I never heard Germans (including myself) pronounce it other than eye-tee. I also think that this is the correct way to pronounce it since Information Technology is an English term and therefore should be pronounced English, not German. However if IT would refer to Informationstechnologie it is a German word and should be pronounced German. Though ...


14

If the original form of the name was Ruhle without an umlaut, its German pronunciation would be very similar to the word ruler in non-rhotic accents of English (which include Australian English), i.e. with two syllables, unlike rule. In the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), the pronunciation would be represented as [ˈruːlə]. If, on the other hand, it ...


14

The German sequence of the basic notes (white keys on piano) is: C, D, E, F, G, A, H. The system is simple. There is no »flat« or »sharp«, just the suffixes »-es« and »-is«. And you have to keep in mind, that the German name of the English B is H. There are five exceptions, they are written in boldface. I will not talk about enharmonic, I guess you know ...


14

The article in the English Wikipedia gives two similar pronunciations /ˈɔɪlər/ (Swiss) and /ˈɔʏlɐ/ (German). I agree with them. The article even has a footnote that explains with references that English-style /ˈjuːlər/ is considered wrong, but it certainly isn’t uncommon. Unlike the variant Lennart or English Leonard, his given name Leonhard is pronounced ...


14

Ich nehme die Aussprache des Professor Crey ebenso wahr wie der Fragesteller. Kurze Recherche aus eigenem Interesse ergibt, dass das Phänomen auch schon in der Literatur diskutiert wurde. Zimmermann berichtet anhand verschiedener Beispiele aus der Literatur über eine "manierte" phonetische Übertreibung des Standarddeutschen. Als Beispiel verweist er etwa ...


14

In your examples, the “ch” follows a consonant, the vowel before the consonant does not matter. After a consonant the pronunciation is like after a front vowel (like e). And even though it was clear to me what you meant, the pronunciation of ch is rather different from English sh, and I am not even sure what pronunciation of English kh you had in mind.


13

Zwar gibt es keine verbindliche einheitliche Ausspracheregelung für die deutsche Sprache, dennoch gab es und gibt es Versuche einer Normierungen: Bühnensprache nach Siebs Völlig auf die Bedürfnisse einer Theaterbühne ausgerichtet, wurde versucht, die Aussprache der Schauspieler auf den deutschen Theaterbühnen Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts zu normieren. Diese ...


13

Wir sind eine zutiefst literale Gesellschaft. Praktisch alles, was wir über Sprache zu wissen glauben, basiert auf ihrer Verschriftung. Darum ist der naive Ansatz, den die meisten Deutschsprechenden verfolgen werden, wenn man sie bittet, ein Wort rückwärts zu sprechen, der buchstabenzentrierte. Da die meisten in der 1. Klasse einige Buchstabenkombinationen ...


13

I have heard exactly one person systematically, non-ironically and non-mockingly pronounce dass as /da:s/, i.e. with a long /a:/. However, that person also systematically pronounced the /a/ sounds in ein nasses Glas identically: as /a:/. Thus, this person is not a good source aside from giving anecdotical evidence.[1] Every single other person I spoke to ...


13

[ç], see Duden as reference. The stage pronounciation rules also leave no other choice. In normal talk I decidedly assume regional variations. Especially for religious terms there seems to be an additional urge, to pronounce them unsloppy (similar to Tag) as incorrect as this may be.


13

Tz indicates that the preceding vowel is short; z doesn’t (though this may still be the case for other reasons). Most other consonants are doubled in such a situation; z is different for historical reasons, and instead of zz we write tz. The same thing happens to k and ß: We write ck instead of kk and ss instead of ßß. This is § 3 of the official spelling ...


13

One problem (but not the only one) with this video is that it uses its own notation for sounds which makes it confusing for people who know IPA. The short u in German is pronounced like the oo in English foot. The IPA symbol for this vowel is ​[⁠ʊ⁠]​. While the German long o (IPA [oː]) may sound very similar when spoken short, I would not consider them the ...


13

This video is nonsense. The speaker himself said at the beginning (0:11 to 0:15): Dafür verwende ich meine eigene phonetische Umschrift. For that I use my own phonetic transcription. This means nothing else but: You can't compare the symbols that I invented without any scientific background with any standard phonetic symbols. In fact the ...


13

Ich denke, diese „Pause“ wird tatsächlich eher ein Glottisschlag sein, und der ist im Deutschen häufig. In der Aussprache wäre der Unterschied zwischen Schülerinnen und Schüler:Innen also ähnlich dem zwischen einer Spiegelei und einem Spiegelei.


12

It is a bit confusing. Originally, the verb is gucken, pronounced with a g as is to be expected from the spelling. However, in northern German dialects, there is an unrelated verb kieken with about the same meaning (to look), giving rise to a hybrid kucken. This, in turn, has expanded quite a bit southward, even into regions where kieken is completely absent ...


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