53 votes
Accepted

Is German a VO language or an OV language?

English is a SVO language. SVO means: Subject, Verb, Object(s) in exactly this order. But English is the only Germanic language with this word order. German and all other Germanic languages (Dutch, ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
36 votes
Accepted

Verb "geeitet" in an old scientific text

This is simply a typo. It should be geleitet instead of geeitet. The infinitive is leiten, and in the given context, it means guide or direct. Der Gedanke hat mich geleitet. → The thought has ...
Björn Friedrich's user avatar
34 votes

Feminine noun with suffix -ung that is not the result of a "Verb to Noun process"

I wrote a little Python script (see below) to find candidate words. It takes a dictionary and yields all uppercase words that end on ung unless: there exists a corresponding lowercase word ending on ...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
  • 21.9k
31 votes
Accepted

geschafft or geschaffen? which one is past participle of schaffen?

"schaffen" has three meanings: to get something managed, to create, to produce something to work (in some regions colloquial or dialect) "geschafft" is the past participle ("...
Nick's user avatar
  • 513
30 votes
Accepted

Feminine noun with suffix -ung that is not the result of a "Verb to Noun process"

I think that die Zeitung fulfills the criteria.
Björn Friedrich's user avatar
27 votes
Accepted

What is the etymology of "Es gibt" in the sense of "There is"?

There is a gradual development from the Germanic and Old High Germangeban in the meaning of to give to the peculiar abstract usage es gibt which only occured in New High German. There is quite an ...
Takkat's user avatar
  • 70.4k
23 votes

Is beeilen always a reflexive verb?

Yes, beeilen is always reflexive in modern usage. You cannot say *er beeilte or *sie beeilte ihn. The counterexample you gave is a different word: herbeieilen. This consists of the intransitive verb ...
phipsgabler's user avatar
  • 5,317
22 votes
Accepted

Are there any other German verbs besides »sein« that take the nominative case?

This construction is usually called "predicative nominative" ("prädikativer Nominativ", "Gleichsetzungsnominativ"), rather than "nominative object". There are a couple of verbs that have it, in ...
Uwe's user avatar
  • 10.7k
22 votes
Accepted

Apart from "berlinern", do any other German dialects have a corresponding verb?

Das gibt es auch bei anderen Dialekten: Der Schwabe schwäbelt. Der Sachse sächselt.
IQV's user avatar
  • 11.5k
21 votes
Accepted

Is leaving out prefixes like "rauf", "rüber", "rein" when describing movement considered a big mistake in spoken German?

No, it is not necessary It does not sound bad or unusual if you use the short version. The longer version just puts more emphasis.
infinitezero's user avatar
  • 18.4k
19 votes
Accepted

When to use 'angeboten' and when to use 'bot'?

The verb is, in its infinitive form (the form you need to look it up in a dictionary): to offer = anbieten Like in I want to offer you a drink. Ich möchte dir ein Getränk anbieten. The form for ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
19 votes
Accepted

dürfen vs "sich dürfen"?

There is a misunderstanding! The reflexive pronoun sich does not belong to the modal verb dürfen, but to the reflexive verb treffen. Without the modal verb it is something like this: Ich treffe ...
Björn Friedrich's user avatar
19 votes

<schwitz>, <zwinker> etc. Does German always use 2nd Person Singular Imperative verbs for emoticons? If so, why?

Not imperative: Knutsch mich ab! *abknutsch* The form looks like an infinitive with the ending -en removed and has been given the jocular name Erikativ after the woman who translated Disney ...
David Vogt's user avatar
  • 26.4k
19 votes
Accepted

When do we not need 'are' in german sentences?

English: You are crazy. you a subject pronoun (second person, singular) are a copulative verb, a form of to be (second person, singular, indicative, present tense, active voice) crazy an adjective ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
18 votes
Accepted

Why does the German dictionary show only 2nd and 3rd person conjugation?

There are around 200 irregular verbs in German (unregelmäßige Verben or starke Verben) and they usually have changes within their roots only for personal pronouns du and er/sie/es. That's probably the ...
juliancadi's user avatar
18 votes
Accepted

How to ask for a bank account "upgrade"?

I checked some german banks which offer an upgrade for their accounts. Clicking these links, you get a webpage with a more legal phrasing, where the bank itself uses the word "wechseln", so you could ...
IQV's user avatar
  • 11.5k
17 votes

What does "auf" mean in "aufsperren"?

As pointed out in Kilian's answer, the "auf" prefix here refers to opening something. It does, however, not negate the pre-ixed word in general (e.g. as opposed to how "to lock"/"to unlock" work in ...
O. R. Mapper's user avatar
  • 8,697
17 votes

Appropriate pronoun for “you” and “someone else who’s not here right now.”

Gehen du und Bob zur Party? Is the right answer here. If they were both standing right in front of you you say Geht ihr zur Party? But one of the people is not there, so you are talking about a ...
Polygnome's user avatar
  • 1,209
16 votes
Accepted

Weihnachtsfest begehen

Man kann ein Fest durchaus begehen. Der Ausdruck ist aber sehr "vornehm" und wird immer seltener verwendet. Für so etwas "normales" wie Weihnachten, das jedes Jahr stattfindet, würde ich ihn eher ...
tofro's user avatar
  • 64.7k
16 votes
Accepted

Non-modal verbs as helping verbs (“I hear you coughing”)

The most direct equivalent to such constructions is an accusative-and-infinitive construction (AcI). It can be used with verbs of perception and similar and the subject of the action that is perceived ...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
  • 21.9k
16 votes

What does "die Augen aufschlugen" mean?

I'm wondering if this might be a colloquial/ugs. in German No, on the contrary it is rather a bit elevated and poetic style, particularly when the intended meaning is "to wake up" and not a more ...
Matthias's user avatar
  • 19k
16 votes

Is German a VO language or an OV language?

In main clauses, German uses V2 (the verb is on second position), and that means VO most of the time. German (V2 -> VO): Julia ruft den Hund. English (VO): Julia calls the dog. Latin (OV): Iulia ...
HalvarF's user avatar
  • 26.9k
15 votes

German verb for 'binge-watch'

I think the expression that's closest in meaning would be eine Serie/einen Film (am Stück) verschlingen It is used in recent news reports about binge-watching as you can tell from this Google ...
adjan's user avatar
  • 2,482
15 votes

Is beeilen always a reflexive verb?

In contemporary German beeilen is always reflexive in usage. This was not always the case. When reading literature from the 19. Century you may come across rare sentences like this: Es wird Gewitter, ...
Takkat's user avatar
  • 70.4k
15 votes
Accepted

Seemingly incorrectly used -e endings for verbs in a DW article

Those are Konjunktiv I forms. See the conjugations of haben gehen gelten Those Konjunktiv I forms are used mainly in press to mark reported speech. DW does not claim those things stated are facts ...
Janka's user avatar
  • 60.3k
14 votes
Accepted

helfen bei vs helfen mit

You often have situation where more than just one preposition fits. You find such cases in English as well as in German. All this examples are correct (I split »beim« into »bei« and »dem« to have the ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
14 votes
Accepted

In "Ich möchte Frau Lohmann sprechen", Is Frau Lohmann the objective of sprechen? or suject of sprechen?

Ich möchte Frau Lohmann sprechen. I want to speak to Frau Lohmann. Frau Lohmann is an accusative object. The reason why this puzzles you is sprechen means both to speak and to speak to someone (acc.)...
Janka's user avatar
  • 60.3k
14 votes
Accepted

Usage of "Hab" during conversations

Imperative The form »hab« in fact is an official conjugation of the verb »haben« in standard German. It is one of the two possible versions of the imperative singular (see »haben« in Wiktionary, ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
14 votes

„Sie traf ein großer Schock!“ Warum nicht „Sie traf einen großen Schock“?

treffen verlangt den Akkusativ, das ist richtig. Hier ist allerdings der Schock das Subjekt im Nominativ und sie ist das Akkusativobjekt. Die Satzstellung weicht hier von der Wortstellung Subjekt-...
Jonathan Scholbach's user avatar

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